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Bee Bird by platypus12 Bee Bird by platypus12
For the #Age-of-Avians Project.

Bee Birds are the descendants of Bee-Eaters. Like their ancestors, Bee Birds live in colonies, however their colonies are more complex and consists of a hierarchy and caste members, much like in colonial insects. Bee Bird colonies are led by females which are larger than the males and are ranked the highest on the social order (even female hatchlings rank higher than the males), which is why they are called Queens. Unlike queens in colonial insects, queen Bee Birds do have control over the colony. Each colony has at least 5 females and only one is allowed to mate and become an official queen.

The rest of the colony consists of males. Their role in the colony changes with age. Young males which are small and bright green are workers and serve the colony by providing food. Workers are typically timid and skittish.

As a male grow older, he grow larger, his feathers become less bright, the yellowish coloration on the top of his heads become red, his behavior changes from timid and skittish to aggressive and territorial, and his beak begins to grow several spike-like growths on the beak which are used for combat, therefore his role changes from worker to soldier. The soldiers serve the colony by defending it. Only the oldest male in the colony will be allowed to mate and be called a Drone.

When the females reach sexual maturity, they will seek out the oldest male in the colony and will even battle over him. The winning female gets the chance to mate with the oldest male and become an official queen, while the losing females will be forced to leave the colony and either start a colony of their own or conquer another colony by assassinating the queen and taking her place. Females who start their own colony will emit a call that can be heard miles away. Any males that are within the range of this call will fly to the source of the call. When they find the female that emitted this call, they will promptly accept her as their queen.

It is common for other males to challenge the Drone for the Queen. If the Drone wins the battle, he will retain his position as the Drone and the Queen's mate while the opposing male (if he survives the battle) will be banished from the colony, however if the opposing male wins, he will take the other male's position as the Drone and become the Queen's new mate while the former Drone (if he survives the battle) will be banished from the colony.
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:iconrobotninjahero:
RobotNinjaHero Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
great idea for a new species of bird. Very creative idea.
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2010
Thanks! :D I got the idea when I was reading this--->[link]
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:iconrobotninjahero:
RobotNinjaHero Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2010
awesome.
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2010
Thanks! :D I thought that Bee-Eaters would be perfect for playing a bee-like role. :D
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:iconrobotninjahero:
RobotNinjaHero Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2010
okay.
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2010
:D
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:iconcelestialpo:
CelestialPo Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
Do you plan to contribute to World of Dinosaurs soon?
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
Perhaps I could start with that vulture-like oviraptor we've been talking about a few days ago.
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:iconcelestialpo:
CelestialPo Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
Right now I am working on Miocene grasslands critters and some Dromaeosaurids.
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2010
So what do you think of the idea of this bird?
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:iconcelestialpo:
CelestialPo Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2010
I like it! They could build big structures out of mud and random tree stuff. And part of it could be underground. Maybe around the Queen there could be a big somewhat dome structure with little light holes around the Queen's nest.

The nsts could also fight eachother, maybe often for resources. With small colonies just doing raids like h Estern steppe raiders to the European cultures.
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2010
That's a very interesting idea! :D Thanks! :D
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
I look forward to seeing them! :D
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:icondinoking22:
DinoKing22 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
cool, I had an idea just likes this but for another kind of bird.
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
Do you suppose that Bee-Eaters would be a good choice for colonial birds?
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:icondinoking22:
DinoKing22 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
yea, the one I chosse was the sociable weaver. you know the ones that biuld giant nests
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
I can imagine them them building a nest similar to that of bees.
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:icondinoking22:
DinoKing22 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
yea, iy would be preatty big
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
Do these birds of yours have caste members?
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:icondinoking22:
DinoKing22 Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2010
what do you mean by caste members?
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2010
As in members that have special roles such as workers and soldiers.
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(1 Reply)
:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
Thanks! :D I got the idea when I read they form colonies. I read about here--->[link]
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:icondinoking22:
DinoKing22 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
cool,
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2010
Thanks! :D *TheCheeseCannibal also made a bird kinda like that! :D
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